The way to be an Authority

Mark 1:21-28
Matthew 5:21-32

When Jesus went into the local synagog people were amazed because he taught with authority. They were used to hearing long discussions about what constituted work on the sabbath and who was allowed to marry whom. A meeting began with the phrase, “Rabbi so and so says X, and Rabbi such and such says Y…” and continued until all parties were exhausted. Normal people went home, fed the kids, planted the fields, and watched the sunset. Jesus began differently. “You have heard in the past… I tell you, ‘love your neighbor.’”

Before Jesus, there had been much discussion about what constituted murder. Is abortion murder? Is it murder if you go to war in a far off jungle and set huts on fire to kill the one enemy hiding among a hundred peasants? Is it murder if you allow the industry that you work for to put a cancer causing chemical into the water? But Jesus said, “Anyone who remains angry at another person is committing murder” (Matthew 5:21-22).

Before Jesus there was a raging debate about how much people should donate, that is, pay in temple tax or place upon the altar for distribution to the poor. Jesus came and said, “If you have a broken relationship with another person, go and heal that break before going to worship or working at a charity” (Matthew 5:23-24).

Before Jesus, we used to debate about when to lawyer up and/or sue someone (Matthew 5:25). We had complicated laws about adultery and divorce (Matthew 5:27-32). Jesus came and taught with authority. He told us to always be compassionate. The whole of the Gospel from the first chapter of Mark to the day Jesus ascended into heaven can be stated in one word, love. Jesus had authority because he never compromised or made our moral choices more complicated than they needed to be. If an action can't be done with real compassion and respect for everyone involved, it shouldn't be done. Loving others is the one task of Jesus’ followers.

After Jesus, we went back to business as usual. Demons quietly took charge of our civic organizations, politics, and even our churches. No one had the authority to kick them out. The last thing that Jesus said to his followers was, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me” (Matthew 28:18). Then he gave the Holy Spirit to those he left behind so that they might have his authority to go into this hurting world and be compassionate. Anyone who knows Jesus can be “an authority” by simply choosing to love the people around them without compromise.

That is all that I know.  

What is written is not that hard: be compassionate
Epiphany 4